Posts Tagged ‘Autobiographies’

the dirtWhile Jordan Peele’s new horror film US may dominate what is on people’s minds this weekend, there was one film that was undeniably on my radar. Back in 2001, the world’s most notorious and decadent group to ever come out of the 1980’s was none other than Mötley Crüe and the band dished on everything with their book The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band which was written by the band and Neil Strauss that helped spark a revolution in rock autobiographies that still dominates to this day. Then back when Mötley Crüe’s retirement tour announcement came in 2013, we found out that Jeff Tremaine (Jackass) was going to direct the film adaptation of the book called The Dirt. The film stars Douglas Booth (Noah) as Nikki Sixx, Colson Baker (Machine Gun Kelly) as Tommy Lee, Iwan Rheon (Game Of Thrones) as Mick Mars, and Daniel Webber (Thumper) as Vince Neil, the charismatic lead singer as the film follows the journey of their humble beginnings all the way through triumph, tragedy, and rebirth as we navigate through the hairspray filled, spandex covered Sunset Strip via Netflix. The film also stars Pete Davidson (Set It Up) as Tom Zutant, Christian Gehring (The Brink) as David Lee Roth, David Costabile (Breaking Bad) as Doc McGhee, Tony Cavalero (The Duff) as Ozzy Osbourne, Max Milner as Razzle, Rebekah Graf (The Amityville Murders) as Heather Locklear, Vince Mattis (Halloween) as Frank Feranna Jr., and many more.

crueAnyone that asks me how the film was is going to wonder how the film was in comparison to another film by the name of Bohemian Rhapsody, but that just isn’t fair in my book. They are two completely different bands with two completely different outcomes and Mötley Crüe certainly didn’t allow them to hold back in this one with any of the ugly details. I definitely thought that was the key to how great this film was because while it does look like the most extravagant life, it shows you that deep down not everything is what it seems to be after a while. While that film did an amazing job as far as casting was concerned, I think the casting crew did an amazing job with the guys they found for this film because I believed that I was watching Mötley Crüe right in front of my eyes. One of the guys who deserves a lot of credit is Colson Baker who plays the wild man Tommy Lee and with the amount of experience he had in acting as compared to the others, he nailed it in my book from the beginning all the way to his look during Dr. Feelgood and beyond. Obviously, you can’t fit everything that you read from a book into a film so a lot of stuff had to be cut out of the book like the fact that Nikki Sixx was dating Lita Ford during the Shout At The Devil days and they left out Tommy’s relationship with Pamela Anderson from the film.

ozzyThere are a lot of scenes and moments in the film that will just leave quite the impact on you and one of those scenes were the moments Vince had when his late daughter Skylar was sick with stomach cancer. Those were some emotionally tough scenes to watch because it was so real and so many people in the world can relate to the struggle. Another one of those scenes was the death of Nicholas Dingley a.k.a. Razzle of Hanoi Rocks who grew to be a very good friend of the band and his death was a huge turning point for the band that would effect them for years to come as you’ll see and read about in the book. One of the things that was absolutely amazing was how they transformed the Sunset Strip and all of the clubs to look like it’s heyday. The set designers deserve an Oscar for the work they put into this film recreating that as well as recreating all the amazing stage setups that Mötley Crüe had from their original club days all the way through. The costume designers also deserve an Oscar for the amazing job they did as they pulled it off and made me believe I was back in the 1980’s. This film is a work of art that needs to be checked out by Mötley Crüe fans everywhere. I would definitely rank this film right up there with some of my favorite rock biopics ever and if you’ve never read the book, do yourself a favor and check it out. The acting is great, the cinematography was great, the editing was great, and the film just kicked ass. I am going to give The Dirt an A+ for a final grade because I also loved the Goodfellas style narrating that you get from each member.

download (3)This is a new segment on here that I am going to try and do even though it takes me a while to read books, but I have read some already and so here is the Heavy Metal Book Report. Motley Crue started the trend of dishing out all the dirty secrets in autobiographies and that is what catches our interests. For Reginald Arvizu a.k.a. Fieldy of Nu-Metal pioneers Korn, it was natural to come out with a book telling everything about his life, but it was definitely one that was unexpected or at least not the first one to respond in the band with a book. He teamed up with Laura Morton to write the book Got The Life: My Journey of Addiction, Faith, Recovery, and Korn. which was released back in February of 2010 right on the heels of (at the time) former member Brian “Head” Welch’s tell all book. Fieldy was laying it all on the table so that we could better understand the man with that iconic bass slap who was heavily involved in the debauchery of heavy metal and how he overcame it to become the better man he is today no holds barred style. It’s a journey that will intrigue every Korn fan young and old. The book kicks off right away with a story that will definitely catch your attention as he thinks back to a time when he and his wife Dena got into a major fight that was fueled by jealousy and a day of drinking. It’s only the prologue, but it definitely catches your attention enough to continue to read.

kornThe style of the book is exactly as the title would describe it to be, it is a journey that you go on with Fieldy as he starts right from his childhood all the way to his life in Korn. You find out right from the beginning that it had to be destiny that brought these guys together considering Fieldy’s mom babysat Jonathan Davis whose dad was in a band with Fieldy’s dad. He talks about the early days of not having money as he struggled to stay a float until they met the man that would complete Korn in none other than Jonathan Davis who was a member of a band called Sexart at the time. It didn’t take much for him to agree and Korn was officially born. One of my other favorite stories is hearing how somethings were done. They recorded their first album at the Indigo Ranch with Ross Robinson and it was time for them to record the song Shoots & Ladders. In order for Jonathan to record his part with the bagpipes, he had to record them on top of the mountain. Of course as the book goes on, you hear all these stories of how difficult of a person he was to deal with when he was on drugs or alcohol. He openly admits in the book to firing people for not bringing him beer or firing bus drivers for driving over too many bumps. It gets so bad that he even mentions that the guys in the band were thinking about throwing him out of the band. Things do get better and Fieldy’s appoach to finding God was a lot different to Head’s because he wont force anyone to feel the same as him. He feels that you need to find your own way to becoming a better you.

The book is a decent read and I had a lot of fun reading the book and learning so much about my favorite band in the whole world in Korn. His writing ability is om target as he is able to shock you with stuff that has happened to him and of course indulging in the type of information about tours that we all want to know about. It’s not all fun and games and he certainly makes you know that just because you are signed, doesn’t mean that everything is going to peachy. I find that sometimes, these guys dive way too much into their drug problems and that it becomes the main topic of the book, but by the title you can see why he indulges in it. I would definitely recommend the book to any fan of Korn or fans of rock autobiographies. I am going to give the book a 3.8 stars out of five for a final grade.