Posts Tagged ‘Judge Dredd’

amongthelivingThis is one of those albums that I wish I covered in the first 100 of these albums of the week, but as I have stated before here’s to the next 100. The next album I am covering comes from one of the members of The Big Four of Thrash Metal in Anthrax and there is a significance to it besides the fact that it’s my favorite Anthrax record. Among The Living came out in March of 1987 and it was one of the albums to complete the stellar line up of albums that were released by what people would eventually coin The Big Four. It’s the album that really put the band which was made up of Joey Belladonna (Vocals), Scott Ian (Guitar), Frank Bello (Bass), Dan Spitz (Guitar), and Charlie Benante (Drums) on the map in the metal world. The album was produced by legendary producer Eddie Kramer (Kiss, Alice Cooper, Peter Frampton) and it was recorded both in the Bahamas (it did the trick for AC/DC) and in Florida. The album cover has Rev. Henry Kane from The Poltergeist films on it which is what Benante claims was the inspiration. The album itself peaked at number 62 on The Billboard Top 200 which was a big deal then and it still is today if a metal band cracks the 100 mark.

Anthrax_1987_Among the living_21. Among The Living– This is one of the most famous tracks that starts off with a very dark and eerie riff that makes you feel like you are entering the depths of hell. The song’s lyrics deal with the character Randall Flagg from Stephen King’s The Stand. 5/5

2. Caught In A Mosh– The ultimate mosh anthem with the hard charging bass line that is in your face. This is still one of my favorite Anthrax songs to hear live. 5/5

3. I Am The Law– This sledgehammer like riff attack is the band’s ode to their favorite comic book character in Judge Dredd. This was also one of the final songs credited to old bassist Danny Lilker. 4/5

4. Efilnikufesin (N.F.L.)– or Nise Fukin Life’s lyrics deal with the life and death of Jon Belushi. I love’s the band ability to go superfast and then get melodic out of nowhere which is evident in this track. 4/5

5. A Skeleton in the Closet– The band must have been obsessed with Stephen King because this track’s lyrical content deals with the Stephen King novella Apt. Pupil. This track is more of the in your face thrash metal that Anthrax was known for. 4/5

indians6. Indians– This is another one of those tracks that was just absolutely huge for the band as it’s named as one of their most famous tracks. It’s starts with it’s stereotypical Indians War Dance music in a track that get’s social conscious about the mistreatment of the Native Americans. 5/5

7. One World– This is one of my favorite less famous tracks on the record with that bass line that is punchy and in your face with amazing guitar playing from Ian and Spitz before they kick into a new riff that will melt your face off. 4/5

8. A.D.I./Horror of It All– Apparently, the A.D.I. in the title stands for either Arabian Douche Intro or Arabian Douchebag Inro. The song starts off with some clean acoustic guitar playing that is eerie and dark before it absolutely rips into some sledgehammer like metal madness. 4/5

9. Imitation of Life– This is a remake of Scott Ian’s other band S.O.D.’s (Stormtroopers Of Death)’s track Aren’t You Hungry? 4/5

My Final Thoughts– This is definitely one of my favorite Anthrax records and one that proves that Joey Belladonna was the right singer for the job and always will be. Every track on the record is phenomenal and to let all of you know the album was dedicated to the memory of Cliff Burton which I forgot to mention in the beginning. If you want to get to know The Big Four, this is definitely an album to start with. Ca you imagine getting Master Of Puppets (Metallica), Reign In Blood (Slayer), Peace Sells… But Who’s Buying? (Megadeth), and this album all in a one year period. Oh my lord! I am giving this record 4.3 stars out of five for a final grade.

cobraIf you were to ask me what film I really wanted to review for Ass Whoopin Wednesdays, I told everyone that it would be a certain Sylvester Stallone that is my absolute favorite. When I think of action movies and Stallone, I always think of his 1986 film Cobra because it was my first movie I watched with him that wasn’t Rocky. In Cobra he plays Marion Cobretti or Cobra for short, who is a tough as nails, no nonsense police Lieutenant on the zombie squad. The zombie squad is basically the strong arm of the law doing the jobs that no other cop wants. In Los Angeles, a killer known as the Night Stalker (Brian Thompson) is running around killing a lot of people until one of his victims, a model named Ingrid (Brigitte Nielsen) manages to get away and now Cobra has to protect her from the maniac before he gets his hands on her. The film also stars Reni Santoni (Dirty Harry) as SGT. Gonzales, Andrew Robinson (Hellraiser) as Detective Monte, John Herzfeld (15 Minutes) as Cho, Lee Garlington (American Pie 2) as Nancy Stalk, Art LaFleur (The Sandlot) as Captain Sears, Marco Rodríguez (The Crow) as The Supermarket Killer, David Rasche (Men In Black III) as Dan, and the film was directed by George P. Cosmatos (Rambo: First Blood II). Before we get into the actual review of the film, let’s check out some stats:

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Marion CobrettiThis is one of my favorite movies because Stallone plays a complete badass who is very conscious of what he puts into his body as far as food is concerned. The mentality behind the way his character operates is almost a pre-cursor to Judge Dredd, so it almost seems that Stallone was perfect for that role as well. Alright, so Brigitte Nielsen wad totally slammin in this film and she eventually becomes the love interest later in the film hence the reason I wrote sort of and as far as a sexual conquest is concerned we don’t see it and it doesn’t really seem implied either hence the question mark. She really isn’t too injured although they did try to kill her which I guess is bad enough. The film has some action and some humor to it, but you have to check out the car that Stallone drives in this film, it’s my absolute favorite car from the movies in the 80’s (its a 50’s car though). The one thing I will say is that Brian Thompson plays a really convincing creepizoid in this film. So, I definitely recommend this film to any 80’s action movie fan. I am giving the film four fists out of five.

cobra Brigette

220px-Judge_Dredd_promo_posterFor today’s comic book/superhero movie of the week for Super Sunday, we are travelling overseas to England for the 1995 film adaptation of Judge Dredd by Rebellion Developments. The 1995 film stars Sylvester Stalone (Cobra) as the title character Judge Dredd in this film that takes us to a future time where the police are the judge, jury, and executioners. You see by 2080, too much of the Earth has become inhabitable with most of the citizens living in these mega cities that have populations over 500 million in capacity. To control these cities, they created a law enforcement called Judges and they controlled how things are done. Unfortunately for Dredd, someone on the council decides to frame the officer with the help of a ghost named Rico (Armand Assante) in order to further his master plan. You see Rico isn’t a literal ghost, just someone that is off the grid and he has plans of his own once he was set free and now it’s up to Dredd to correct all the wrongs. The film also stars Diane Lane (Man Of Steel) as Judge Hershey, Rob Schneider (Grown Ups) as Fergee, Jürgen Prochnow (Beverly Hills Cop 2) as Judge Griffin, Max von Sydow (Shutter Island) as Chief Justice Fargo, Joan Chen (On Deadly Ground) as Dr. Ilsa, Balthazar Getty (Lord Of The Flies) as Cadet Olmeyer, Christopher Adamson (Les Misérables) as Mean Machine, James Remar (The Warriors) as Block Warlord, and the film was directed by Danny Cannon (I Still Know What You Did Last Summer).

diane lane Judge DreddThis version of Judge Dredd was typical looking of any film from the 90’s where the sets were out of this world and quite frankly a little campy. Its amazing when you watch this film and Demolition Man, the sets are almost identical to each other where the future looks dark, and the buildings of the future are a little out of this world along with the costumes. What can be said about Sylvester Stallone’s performance in this film other than the fact that it was a typical performance from the 80’s action hero. One thing is for sure and that is that Armand Assante played the perfect villain in this film as he was everything that our hero was not, but no one knows our hero better than Rico. You’re probably wondering which film was better? The 1995 version of Judge Dredd or the 2012 version Dredd with Karl Urban? Each version served it’s purpose, but Stallone’s is a more humanized version where he actually takes his helmet off in the film and the acting was good. The 2012 version obviously has the better special effects because technology is more updated, but I did enjoy this film a lot especially since I thought Rob Schneider being the comedic relief wasn’t necessarily needed in the film and Diane Lane was terrific as usual. I am going to give the film a B- for a final grade.